Man Going Fishing

Gender
Male
Style
Inuit
Community
Art Type
Print
Collection
Pangnirtung 1974
Medium
Stonecut on Kozuke Kozo Natural paper
Edition
Certified Limited Edition Print # 21 of 49 printed by Lipa Pitsiulak
Size (in)
Paper (H x W): 24 ½ x 34 in
Size (cm)
Paper (H x W): 62 x 86 cm
Framed
Not Framed, please enquire
Product ID
10300-00219

$550.00

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Description

*** ONLY COPY AVAILABLE ***

Condition:          No condition to report.

Description by Artist:     “If a man is going to hunt, it is very important that he knows the land and respects it.”  – Lipa Pitsiulak.

Notes from DaVic Gallery:  Most dramatic piece by Lipa, in my opinion.  Watch video documentary with Lipa Pitsiulak below…

One single hunter alone in the arctic going fishing with nothing but his spear in hand and tools in his backback.  Pitsiulak makes great use of negative space available with such large paper, 24” x 34”, giving the illusion of solitude in such vast empty white space that resembles what Inuit experience in the arctic.  Only an Inukshuk far in the horizon keeps company and gives direction to this hunter.  The traditional hunting method would be to erect a series of inukshuiit in a funnel shaped pattern narrowing to a dead end on a hillside. The hunters would hide behind the inukshuiit armed with their bows and arrows. The women and children would herd the caribou towards the hunters by waving hides up and down to create loud noises, enabling the hunters to move behind the herd. The inukshuiit would also double as landmarks or cairns (stone piles) identifying the locations of caches of stored meat.

Today the inukshuk is used predominantly as a landmark. They can be found scattered across the frozen land. An inukshuk can be spotted from miles away and seasoned travelers can use the inukshuiit as navigational aids.