Nimpkish Sunset

Artist:
Andy Everson, See available art.
Gender:
Male
Style:
Northwest Coast
Community:
Kwakwaka’wakw, See available art.
Art Type:
Print
Collection:
2013
Medium:
Giclée on Moab Entrada cotton paper
Edition:
Signed Limited Edition Print # 39 and 40 of 99 printed by Andy Everson
Size (in):
Paper (H x W): 17 x 22 in
Size (cm):
Paper (H x W): 43 x 56 cm
Framed:
Not Framed, please enquire
Product ID:
11000-00008

$245.00

Available!

Description

Nimpkish Sunset’ by Andy Everson – First Nations Northwest Coast Kwakwaka’wakw Art presented by DaVic Gallery of Native Canadian Arts.

Condition:          No condition noted.

Description by Artist:   ‘Nimpkish Sunset’  –    In ancient times, many of our first ancestors appeared, not as humans, but as animals, birds and creatures from the sea. In the early myth time, they could remove their animal skins and walk as people upon the land. One such ancestor from the ‘Na̱mg̱is (Nimpkish) was named ‘Na̱mukustolis who first arrived as a great blue heron and soon transformed himself into a human.

He was warned that there was going to be a great flood that would cover the earth and that he should wait for an enormous sea monster named ‘Na̱mx̱iyalegiyu to rise from the depths. The sea monster took ‘Na̱mukustolis under the water in order to protect him from the floods. When the waters had receded, Na̱mx̱iyalegiyu put ‘Na̱mukustolis onto the shore where he started the first Nimpkish village called X̱wa̱lkw and became the first ancestor of the ‘Na̱mg̱is people.

Later ‘Na̱mukustolis met Ḵ̓aniḵilakw, the Transformer. In a great battle of transformation, the two pitted their skills upon one another, transforming each other into ducks, mountains and kingfishers. Resigned to this stalemate, Ḵ̓aniḵilakw travelled on. Cognizant that Ḵ̓aniḵilakw might return, however, ‘Na̱mukustolis wondered what he should transform himself into for protection. At first he thought he should become a stone, but he quickly realized that stones will eventually crack. The he thought he should change into a big tree, but it occurred to him that trees will gradually fall and rot away. Eventually, he decided that he would become a great river and flow until the end of days. ‘Na̱mukustolis then took on the name Gwanalalis to reflect on this desire. Ḵ̓aniḵilakw could hear his thoughts so he returned and pushed on the forehead of Gwanalalis. He fell to the ground and became the great Nimpkish River, Gwa’ni, and was filled with fish so as to provide for his people.

In October of 2011, I was given the name of the great grandson of ‘Na̱mukustolis, Ḵ̓wa̱mxa̱laga̱lis. My great-great grandmother’s eldest brother, Fred Innis, also held this name. He carried a talking stick representing the great blue heron and held the winter dance name, Gwanalalis. All I can reflect on is that we have a history that is truly as beautiful as any sunset….

Notes from DaVic Gallery:    “Nimpkish Sunset” is a limited edition print using the giclée method of printmaking. This print was released in July of 2013 and printed by Andy Everson at Copper Canoe, the artist’s own studio in Comox B.C. A total of 109 prints bear the title “Nimpkish Sunset” and are signed by Andy Everson: 99 in the primary edition bearing the numbers 1/99 through 99/99; 9 Artist’s Proof; and 1 Printer’s Proof. The acid-free Moab Entrada 100% cotton rag paper measures 17 x 22 inches. Image size measures about 13.3 x 20 inches.