Philip Edward Island

Artist:
James Simon Mishibinijima, See available art.
Gender:
Male
Style:
Woodland
Community:
Anishinaabe, See available art.
Art Type:
Mishmountain, Painting, Tabletop
Collection:
Mishmountains Tabletops
Medium:
Original acrylic on canvas
Edition:
Original Painting
Size (in):
Canvas (H x W x D): 8 x 8 x 2 in
Size (cm):
Canvas (H x W x D): 20 x 20 x 5 cm
Framed:
No Framed
Product ID:
13020-00308

$10,656.00

Available!

Description

Philip Edward Island‘ Mishmountain by First Nations Ojibwe artist James Simon Mishibinijima – Original Woodland Art style painting presented by DaVic Gallery of Native Canadian Arts

Condition:       No condition to report.

Description by Artist:     Mishmountain “Philip Edward Island” – North Channel in Georgian Bay in Lake Huron holds sacred landscapes, these island were used in ceremonies, Georgian Bay called Bay of Thousand Islands and native ancestors who used the Great Lake Waterways for trade and food came upon these islands performing sacred ceremonies. People always comment why are certain stones very light in weight than others in these islands it’s because the stones were heated one time and used in sweat lodge ceremonies and Philip Edward Island on of these islands filled with such stones if ones looking for them, circle with a dot image on the throat on this painting represents the symbol of the great spirit and the fork around it represent hands of the great spirit. The breast is the tree of life or nourishment giving what Mother Earth supplies mankind and all living being that lives on it, were no more important than a blade of grass I was once told, the circle of egg design on the stomach represents our children and future generations to come, lines of color for each section such as the breast, arms neck,, you will find at least 3 or 5 color lines connected along the edge that presents everything’s connected the way it was design by the great spirit. We mankind are the custodians of the earth and stand at the bottom like the bear on the totem pole but sometime along their way, mankind put himself on top and not caring for the life on the planet not knowing, this is the only planet we have to survive.” – James Simon Mishibinijima

Notes from DaVic Gallery:    Earth is alive, mountains are alive and anthropomorphized.  Mountains lay and sleep while accumulating and safekeeping stories, legends, experiences and they are forever keepers of all these secrets and knowledge.  Only the few see, only the few willing to see and receive the teachings.  Seven are teachings, four are the roots growing.  Truly deep and evocating painting by James Mishibinijima presenting to the world deep knowledge that the earth holds.

Note that Grandfather Stones tabletops are used only for staging and are not included with purchase of Little Squaw.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags:  First Nations Art collectors; First Nations Art; Indigenous Art; Native Art; Woodland Art, Ojibwe Art, Anishinaabe Art
Related:    Grandfather Stones,  Tree of Life,  Understandings,  Black StoneBlueberry Hill,  Dreamer’s Cove,  Dreamer’s Rock,  Fisher Harbour,  Little La Cloche,  Logan Bay,   Wolf Creek,  Little Squaw
References:   Native Art In CanadaAnishinaabeg BimaadiziwinNative Art In Canada