Spirit Wolf

Artist:
Jim Oskineegish, See available art.
Gender:
Male
Style:
Woodland
Community:
Anishinaabe, See available art.
Art Type:
Painting
Collection:
2016
Medium:
Original acrylic on white canvas
Edition:
Original Painting
Size (in):
Canvas (H x W x D): 24 x 30 x ¾ in
Size (cm):
Canvas (H x W x D): 61 x 76 x 2 cm
Framed:
Not Framed, please enquire
Product ID:
13020-00016

$1,350.00

Available!

Description


Spirit Wolf‘ by First Nations Ojibwe artist Jim Oskineegish – Original Woodland Art style painting presented by DaVic Gallery of Native Canadian Arts


Condition:       No condition to report.


Description by Artist:     No description provided


Notes from DaVic Gallery:     Ojibwe Teachings – The teachings in the Ojibwe culture have been traditionally passed down from generation to generation orally through stories and ceremonies.  Historically, this has been done by the elders that carry the stories and traditions.  Today, the oral traditions are being shared by those who carry the knowledge of such things.  The teachings of all Aboriginal cultures encompass the morals, values, structures, ceremonial practices, spiritual beliefs of the group.  These teachings also ensured the survival of the people.  For the Ojibwe people, the teachings vary from nation to nation, because of the geographical placement of each particular group.  However, the Ojibwe teachings commonly come from the same root and share a similar message.

7 Grandfather Teachings – Of all the North American Indigenous teachings, the 7 Grandfather Teachings are the most commonly shared from coast to coast.  Many Aboriginal organizations and communities have adopted the 7 guiding principles, in one form or another, as a moral stepping stone and cultural foundation.  There are stories of the origins of the 7 Grandfather Teachings in all communities.  Each community has adapted the teachings to suit their community values.

Humility – Dbaadendiziwin is represented by the wolf.  For the wolf, life is lived for his pack and the ultimate shame is to be outcast. Humility is to know that your are a sacred part of creation.  Live life selflessly and not selfishly.  Respect your place and carry your pride with your people and praise the accomplishments of all.  Do not become arrogant and self-important.  Find balance in within yourself and all living things.


 

 

 

 

 

First Nations Art collectors; First Nations Art; Indigenous Art; Native Art; Woodland Art, Ojibwe Art, Anishinaabe Art
Related:  Timber Wolf,   Independence,   Greatly Received,   Leadership,   Living in Peace,  The Hunter