Tree of Life

Artist:
James Jacko, See available art.
Gender:
Male
Style:
Woodland
Community:
Anishinaabe, See available art.
Art Type:
Painting
Collection:
2015
Medium:
Original acrylic on white canvas
Edition:
Original Painting
Size (in):
Canvas (H x W x D): 48 x 36 x 1 in
Size (cm):
Canvas (H x W x D): 122 x 91 x 3 cm
Framed:
Not Framed, please enquire
Product ID:
13220-00051

$5,500.00

Available!

Description

Tree of Life‘ by First Nations Anishinaabe artist James Jacko – Original Woodland Art style painting presented by DaVic Gallery of Native Canadian Arts

Condition:       No condition to report.

Description by Artist:     ‘Tree of Life‘ – “The tree symbolizes life and strength…that is also why the tree is filled with leaves and fruit, to symbolize life.  The seven birds and the seven blue rocks on the ground symbolize the Seven Gifts, or the Seven Grandfather`s teachings, which are love, respect, honesty, bravery, humility, truth, and wisdom.  The faces in the lower corner symbolize the voice of those teaching from our ancestors.  The glowing bluish/grey circles also symbolize our ancestors and guardians.  The people represent all that is and are in the constant learning of these gifts.” – James Jacko

Notes from DaVic Gallery:     Many Aboriginal organizations and communities have adopted the Seven guiding principles, in one form or another, as a moral stepping stone and cultural foundation.  There are stories of the origins of the Seven Grandfather Teachings in all communities.  Many Anishinaabe view the Seven Grandfather Teachings as traditional knowledge that collectively represents what is needed for community survival. The origin of the teachings is unknown but elders confirm these are important verbs that have long been a part of the language. These fundamental teachings became widely known as the “Seven Grandfathers” when the Anishinaabe slowly began to control their own education during and after the American Indian Movement. As elders began to retell stories they heard as children they connected the present to a past when these values were both a part of ceremonies and everyday life. Regardless of how they came to be used together, when they now appear in a circle they symbolize much of what defines Minobimaadizi / Living Well.  These is the reason the Seven Grandfathers are often depicted as rocks as foundation for where we all stand.  Without them, our relationship weakens and falls apart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Nations Art collectors; First Nations Art; Indigenous Art; Native Art; Woodland Art

Related:   Love,  Life,  A Symbol of Teachings From Our Creator,  The Voice of the Creator,  The Tree of Knowledge,   Stand With Our Teachings

References:   Native Art In CanadaAnishinaabeg Bimaadiziwin