Untitled (People and Inuksuit)

Artist:
Winnie Tatya, See available art.
Gender:
Female
Style:
Inuit
Community:
Baker Lake, See available art.
Art Type:
Wall-Hanging
Collection:
Tapestry: Baker Lake 2015
Medium:
Duffel, felt, embroidery floss
Edition:
Original
Size (in):
Tapestry (H x W): 18 x 24 ½ in
Size (cm):
Tapestry (H x W): 46 x 62 cm
Framed:
Not Framed, please enquire
Product ID:
10030-00023

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Notes from DaVic Gallery:   Three women, three men and four children from different camps or village are together building or Inuksuit.  Used for thousands of years, the Inukshuk is a very important aspect of the Inuit culture.

The word Inukshuk means “to act similar to that of a human.”  The stone figures were often used in the daily and spiritual lives of the Inuit people of the Canadian Arctic.  A man-made stone landmark made of balanced rock, the Inukshuk was often used to navigate through the harsh climate of the north and to aid Inuit hunters.

Skilled Inuit hunters erected the Inukshuk to confuse caribou into thinking that they were being chased by many hunters.  The Inukshuk were placed strategically on two sides of a valley while the hunter waited at the end with bow and spear in hand.  The success of this hunting method gave the Inukshuk a folklore status among the people of the far north.

A very important part of Inuit culture, the Inukshuk has become a part of Inuit folklore and a symbol of the proud Inuit history.  The Inuit people celebrate the Inukshuk through the handcrafted carvings that sell throughout galleries all over the world.